C Creating And Editing Functinons

 

For this assignment, download the A6 code pack. This zip file contains several files: main.cpp – the predetermined main.cpp. This file shows the usage and functionality that is expected of your program. You are not allowed to edit this file. You will not be submitting this file with your assignment. CMakeLists.txt – the preset CMake file to build with your functions files. input/greeneggsandham.txt – the contents of Green Eggs and Ham in text format. input/aliceChapter1.txt – the first chapter of Alice in Wonderland in text format. output/greeneggsandham.out – the expected output when running your program against the greeneggsandham.txt file output/aliceChapter1.out – the expected output when running your program against the aliceChapter1.txt file

 

Your task is to provide the implementations for all of the referenced functions. You will need to create two files: functions.h and functions.cpp to make the program work as intended.

You will want to make your program as general as possible by not having any assumptions about the data hardcoded in. Two public input files have been supplied with the starter pack. We will run your program against a third private input file. Function Requirements

The requirements of each function are given below. The input, output, and task of each function is described. The functions are: promptUserForFilename() openFile() readWordsFromFile() removePunctuation() capitalizeWords() filterUniqueWords() alphabetizeWords() countUniqueWords() printWordsAndCounts() countLetters() printLetterCounts() printMaxMinWord() printMaxMinLetter() promptUserForFilename()

Input: None

Output: A string

Task: Prompt the user to enter a filename. openFile()

Input: (1) The input file stream (2) The string filename to open

Output: True if the file successfully opened, False if the file could not be opened

Task: Open the input file stream for the corresponding filename. Check that the file opened correctly. The string filename will remain unchanged. readWordsFromFile()

Input: The input file stream

Output: A vector of strings

Task: Read all of the words that are in the filestream and return a list of all the words in the order present in the file. removePunctuation()

Input: (1) A vector of strings (2) A string of all the punctuation characters to remove

Output: None

Task: For each word in the vector, remove all occurrences of all the punctuation characters denoted by the punctuation string. When complete, the input vector will now hold all the words with punctuation removed. The punctuation string will remain unchanged. capitalizeWords()

Input: A vector of strings

Output: None

Task: For each word in the vector, convert each character to its upper case equivalent. When complete, the input vector will now hold all the words capitalized. filterUniqueWords()

Input: A vector of strings

Output: A vector of strings

Task: The function will return only the unique words present in the input vector. The output vector will not contain any duplicate words. alphabetizeWords()

Input: A vector of strings

Output: None

Task: Sort the strings in the input vector alphabetically. When complete, the input vector have the same length and contents but reordered so that the contents are in alphabetical order. countUniqueWords()

Input: (1) A vector of strings representing all of the words in the file (2) A vector of strings representing only the unique words in the file

Output: A vector of unsigned integers

Task: For every unique word in the list, count the number of occurrences the unique word is present in the full text. Return a vector of all the counts. Each position in the vector of counts corresponds to the same position in the unique word list. The vector of counts will have the same size as the vector of unique words. Upon completion, neither input vector will be modified. printWordsAndCounts()

Input: (1) A vector of strings (2) A vector of unsigned integers

Output: None

Task: For each word and count in the vectors, print out the word and its corresponding count. Upon completion, the two vectors will remain unchanged. Format the output as follows: #P : ABCDEF : #C

Notice how there are three columns separated by :. We want the : aligned in every row and the values aligned in each column. The columns correspond to the following values: #P – The position the word in the list. Begin at 1. Right align all values. Allocate enough space for the length of the last position. (If there are less than 10 numbers, then we need only 1 space. If there are less than 100 numbers, then we need only 2 spaces. And so on. Assume there will be at most 109 unique words.) ABCEDF – The unique word. Left align all values. Allocate enough space for the longest word present in the list. #C – The corresponding count of the unique word. Right align all values. Allocate enough space for the length of the largest number. (Assume there will be at most 109 unique words.)

An example with actual values is shown below: 1 : BIRTHDAY : 4
2 : BJORNE   : 1
3 : HAPPY    : 4
4 : TO       : 4
5 : YOU      : 3

Refer to the expected output files for longer examples on the expected formatting. countLetters()

Input: (1) An array of 26 unsigned integers (2) A vector of strings

Output: None

Task: Count the number of occurrences of each letter present in all words. Each position of the array corresponds to each letter as ordered by the English alphabet. Upon completion, the array will hold the counts of each letter and the vector of strings will remain unchanged. printLetterCounts()

Input: An array of 26 unsigned integers

Output: None

Task: For each letter, print out the letter and its corresponding count. Format the output as follows: A : #C
B : #C

Y : #C
Z : #C

Notice how there are two columns separated by :. We want the : aligned in every row and the values aligned in each column. The columns correspond to the following values: A – The letter #C – The corresponding count of the letter. Right align all values. Allocate enough space for the length of the largest number. (Assume there will be at most 109 unique words.)

An example with actual values is shown below: A :  8
B :  5
C :  0
D :  4
E :  1
F :  0
G :  0
H :  8
I :  4
J :  1
K :  0
L :  0
M :  0
N :  1
O :  8
P :  8
Q :  0
R :  5
S :  0
T :  8
U :  3
V :  0
W :  0
X :  0
Y : 11
Z :  0

Refer to the expected output files for longer examples on the expected formatting. printMaxMinWord()

Input: (1) A vector of strings (2) A vector of unsigned integers

Output: None

Task: Print out the two words that occur least often and most often. If there is more than one word that occurs the same number of times, print the one that comes first alphabetically. Upon completion, both input vectors will remain unchanged. Print out the following pieces of information: The word The number of occurrences The frequency of appearance as a percentage to 3 decimal places

Format the output as follows: Least Frequent Word: ABCDEF #C (#P%)
Most Frequent Word:  ABCDEF #C (#P%)

Notice how there are three columns of values. The columns correspond to the following values: ABCEDF – The word. Left align all values. Allocate enough space for the longer of the two words. #C – The corresponding count of the word. Right align all values. Allocate enough space for the length of the larger number. (Assume there will be at most 109 unique words.) #P – The frequency of the word. Right align all values. Print to three decimal places.

An example with actual values is shown below: Least Frequent Word: BJORNE   1 (  6.250%)
Most Frequent Word:  BIRTHDAY 4 ( 25.000%)

Refer to the expected output files for longer examples on the expected formatting. printMaxMinLetter()

Input: An array of 26 unsigned integers

Output: None

Task: Print out the two letters that occur least often and most often. If there is more than one letter that occurs the same number of times, print the one that comes first alphabetically. Upon completion, the input array will remain unchanged. Print out the following pieces of information: The letter The number of occurrences The frequency of appearance as a percentage to 3 decimal places

Format the output as follows: Least Frequent Letter: A #C (#P%)
Most Frequent Letter:  Z #C (#P%)

Notice how there are three columns of values. The columns correspond to the following values: A – The letter. #C – The corresponding count of the letter. Right align all values. Allocate enough space for the length of the larger number. (Assume there will be at most 109 occurrences.) #P – The frequency of the letter. Right align all values. Print to three decimal places.

An example with actual values is shown below: Least Frequent Letter: C  0 (  0.000%)
Most Frequent Letter:  Y 11 ( 14.667%)

Refer to the expected output files for longer examples on the expected formatting. Functional Requirements You may not make use of the standard library functions sort(), find(), any_of() or anything else from #include <algorithm>. You must implement your own sorting and searching functions. DO NOT use global variables. You must use parameters properly, either pass-by-value or pass-by-reference. Do not use any global variables. You must use parameters properly. Mark parameters as const appropriately if the function is not modifying the parameter value. For this assignment, the output must match the example outputs exactly. For this assignment, only submit your functions.h and functions.cpp files. Do not include main.cpp, CMakeLists.txt, or any of the other input/output files.

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